Taking Stock of the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan

Understanding the fragile politics underlying the moratorium in the South Sudan conflict.
Understanding the fragile politics underlying the moratorium in the South Sudan conflict.

Stability in the Democratic Republic of the Congo beyond the Elections

Stability in the Democratic Republic of the Congo beyond the Elections
Joseph Kabila seeks to maintain the status quo as the Democratic Republic of the Congo enters a transition amid growing instability.

Understanding Cameroon’s Crisis of Governance

Understanding Cameroon’s Crisis of Governance

Cameroon’s two-year-old national crisis threatens the country’s very foundations, says scholar Christopher Fomunyoh. In this video, Fomunyoh discusses the nature and causes of the grievances that brought this crisis to a head, as well as recommendations for addressing them.

Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

Advancing Military Professionalism in Africa

Clarifying mission, oversight and the relationship between soldiers and citizens can advance the professionalism eluding many African security services.

Taking Stock of Somalia’s Security Landscape

Taking Stock of Somalia’s Security Landscape

In this Africa Center roundtable, Somalia’s National Security Advisor shares his vision for establishing a stable Somalia. Priority reforms include strengthening oversight of the security sector and improving security support to rural communities most vulnerable to Al Shabaab.

Topic in Focus: Electoral Security
The Impact of Social Media and Digital Technology on Electoral Violence in Kenya

Social media was first used extensively in the run up to the 2007 elections in Kenya and has been used ever since. Digital platforms have been used to incite violence and hatred as well as to fight such messages and promote a peaceful electoral process. But the Kenyan government, civil society and citizens, need to do more to make social media and digital technology a tool for peace. In particular, they should promote mechanisms to limit hate speech, improve accountability among internet service providers so they can curb hate and fear mongering, and train law enforcement to more effectively investigate and prosecute such speech, all while protecting the constitutional right to free speech.

The 2015 SADC Election Guidelines: Can They Work?

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) first published election guidelines in 2004. They were nonbinding, included no input from civil society, outlined no consequences for violation, and resulted in largely political exercises. SADC’s 2015 revisions are much stronger, reflecting impressive commitment by the body to institutionalizing democratic norms. Under the revised guidelines, observers should: begin missions 90 days early to forestall problems and monitor intimidation; stay afterward to monitor post-election violence; and include civil society groups in their missions. Important terms like “free and fair” are now defined too, allowing SADC to more objectively apply consequences to those who infringe on the guidelines.