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Conflict in Africa: Why It Persists

By the Africa Center for Strategic Studies

October 27, 2016

After years of decline, conflict in Africa has recently been increasing. Paul Williams, Phillip Carter, and Ibrahim Wani provided insight on why conflict persists in Africa at a roundtable hosted by the Africa Center.

While Africa has seen a broad decline in conflict in the years since the end of the Cold War, that trend has reversed in recent years, largely as a result of increased non-state conflict. This upsurge is characterized by religious elements, the direct targeting of civilians, and environmental pressures, as well as regional concentrations. Just six countries account for 85 percent of non-state conflict in Africa: Sudan, South Sudan, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Somalia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Paul Williams, Phillip Carter, and Ibrahim Wani provided insights and analysis at a roundtable hosted by the Africa Center for Strategic Studies as part of its 2016 Next Generation of African Security Sector Leaders academic program.

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